Tag Archives: Fall

Harvest Risotto

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The autumnal equinox has officially passed, and we are now experiencing the evening hours growing darker and the air growing more crisp. I’m more accustomed to the Indian Summers of Texas, so this more iconic autumn weather here in Virginia is a refreshing change of pace.

Along with the shift in temperatures come a shift in palate. Instead of seafood and endless summer squash, I’m craving heartier roasts and roots. “Storage” crops like winter squash in whimsical varieties also grace the store shelves, and they make a delicious addition to this classic, comforting dish.

 

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Rice has a contentious role within the “paleosphere.” Being that it is a grain, it is not included in paleo canon, but has found neutral favor in many circles (such as here, here, and here) for those who tolerate it. Some have even purported specific benefits.

Until we discovered Isaac’s dairy intolerance, I had been waking up with him several times a night between his 7th and 13th month of age. These perpetual sleep interruptions paired with an accidental gluten ingestion over Memorial Day led to the most significant adrenal crash I’ve had since before I went gluten free. After spending most of June and all of July sick with never-ending respiratory infections, I’ve been working to specifically bring my adrenal function back to baseline health. A vital part of adrenal recovery is moderating glucose, as too much of a glucose load stresses out the adrenals, but without sufficient cortisol, my body isn’t efficient at gluconeogenesis (manufacturing necessary glucose in the absence of dietary carbohydrates). It’s a balancing act, and including rice in my diet (in addition to starchy vegetables like squashes, parsnips, plantains, and all manner of potato) keeps my carb intake from dipping too low while keeping my sugar cravings at bay. It also makes my trips to the local Thai restaurant more frequent, but that’s beside the point.

Rice is made particularly flavor-full and nutrient-dense in this risotto with the inclusion of not only seasonal squashes and seeds, but mineral-and-collagen-rich chicken stock. I’ve used my own home brew in this recipe, but store-bought broth will work in a pinch (Pacific Natural is gluten-free), and I imagine mushroom stock would be particularly delicious!

 

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Harvest Risotto
{gluten free, dairy free-optional, vegan-optional}
Serves 6-8

4 cups (1 quart) chicken, vegetable, or mushroom stock
3 cups water
1-2 tbsp ghee, butter, or coconut oil
2 leeks, green and white parts sliced
2 large cloves garlic, minced
1.5 cup arborio rice
1 cup hard cider, dry preferably (substitute fresh apple cider for non-alcoholic)
1 lb of butternut squash, peeled and chopped into 1/2″ cubes (about 1 small squash)
1/4 cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
1 tsp ground sage
1/2 tsp ground thyme
1-1.5 tsp kosher salt (or to taste)
black pepper to taste
raisins for garnish (optional)

Make sure you have all your ingredients chopped/minced/sliced ahead of time.

Pour the stock and water together in a large saucepan and set over high heat. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a gentle simmer. You will maintain this simmer for the duration of the recipe.

Set a separate, large saute pan over medium heat and add the butter/ghee/coconut oil. Once the fat is melted and shimmery (but not burning), add the leeks. Gently saute until soft, usually 3-5 minutes, being careful not to burn. Add the garlic and dry rice and saute together until the rice is gently toasted, about 5 more minutes. Add the hard cider and continue to stir frequently until the cider has been fully absorbed into the rice and there is none pooling in the pan.

Now, add a ladle-full of stock to the rice. In similar fashion to the cider, stir frequently while the rice absorbs the stock. Be careful not to let the pan get so hot that the stock evaporates instead of absorbing into the rice. Once each ladle-full of stock is absorbed, add another ladle-full, continuing on with the stirring-absorbing-and-adding-more-stock. This is a great time to turn on some music and sip the rest of that cider you have.

Once you have used about half of the stock, stir in the butternut squash and pepitas. Continue ladling-and-stirring the stock into the rice until both the butternut squash and the rice are soft and cooked-through. The rice will be sticky and creamy.

Stir in the sage, thyme, salt, and pepper.

Serve warm, topped with raisins, if desired.

Curried Pumpkin-Cauliflower Soup

 

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That’s right. Another pumpkin recipe. But it’s only September, and with our first real cold front coming through tomorrow, I believe it’s high time for soup to hit the household menu.

Soups are perhaps my favorite cool-weather food to prepare. They’re incredibly simple, and they’re a fantastic way to consume a variety of vegetables without having to force another forkful of cold, bitter greens into your mouth. Pumpkin, in particular, as well as plenty of other winter squashes, bring a particular savory sweetness to this soup that plays against the tingly warmth of the curry spices. The coconut milk and  cauliflower, being a common ingredients in Indian fare, tie the flavors all together with velvety richness.

 

Curried Pumpkin-Cauliflower Soup
{paleo, gluten free, vegan-optional}

2 tbsp ghee, butter, or coconut oil
1 large onion, diced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp fresh ginger, grated (about a thumb-sized knob)
2 tsp garam masala
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
2 tsp salt
1 quart chicken or vegetable stock
4 cups cauliflower florets
1-14 oz can pumpkin puree (about 2 cups)
1-14 oz can full-fat coconut milk (about 2 cups)

In a large saucepan, melt the ghee, butter, or coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onion and saute until mostly translucent. Add the garlic, ginger, garam masala, cumin, coriander and salt, and stir for a minute or two until highly fragrant.

Add the stock, cauliflower, and pumpkin puree. Bring to a boil, then lower to a steady simmer, and cook until cauliflower is soft and easily pierced with a fork.

Remove from heat, add the coconut milk. Puree the soup using an immersion blender, or by (carefully!) blending in batches in either a blender or a food processor.

 

Sweet Potato, Apple, & Poblano Hash

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One of my very favorite things about this time of year is that the great variety of seasonal chiles appear in the farmers markets and grocery stores. As a native Texan, you might think that my favorite of these is the jalapeño. It’s not. Those things are perfect paired with cream cheese for Armadillo eggs or for stuffing tamales, but they’re not my favorite. No, mine’s the poblano. It barely makes the chart on the scoville scale, carrying just a tinge of heat, but provides a lot of flavor. I never make chile con carne the same way twice, but my best versions always contained roasted poblanos. But that’s another post.

Lately I’ve been eating a lot of hash. The tiny baby-bite-sized cubes are perfect for Isaac to pick at, and I find that a dish of hash with two eggs baked on top makes for the most satisfying breakfast. This morning I found myself (sadly) without bacon, but when I realized I had a green apple and a farmers market poblano on hand, I realized I could make a hash perfect for a September breakfast.

 

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Sweet Potato, Apple, & Poblano Hash
{gluten free, paleo}
Serves 2

1 large sweet potato
1 green apple
1 poblano chile
2 tbsp pastured lard, ghee, or coconut oil
1 tsp coarse salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
2 green onions

Dice the sweet potato and apple into a fine dice. These need to be finely diced rather than chopped into large cubes, so that they will cook sufficiently in the pan.

Cut the poblano in half length-wise, remove the seed, membrane, and stem, and finely dice.

Set a cast iron pan over medium-high heat and add the fat to the pan. All the fat to heat up, but don’t let it get so hot that it smokes.

Add the sweet potato, apple, and poblano to the pan and toss to combine. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Allow to cook on medium or medium-high, stirring ONLY OCCASIONALLY. You want the sweet potato to develop some caramelization, and that won’t happen if it all keeps getting tossed around. After about 10-15 minutes, test a piece of sweet potato to make sure that it’s cooked through.

Sliced up some green onions and serve on top.

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*DON’T FORGET! I’ve got a giveaway going on HERE through 9/16/14 at 11:59 PM. Don’t miss out! *

 

 

Winter Squash & Chestnut Soup

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Today, on the very first day of October, I turned off my air conditioner and opened my windows. There’s a slight chill in the air and I’m breathing it all in deep.

It’s really starting to feel like fall here. I spotted several yellow spots on varying trees. I can probably wear long sleeves without (too much) problem. At night, I wear sweatshirts when I go outside, and we even had a fire in our fireplace a few nights ago. My Netflix movie came in today. Sleepy Hollow.

I’m so ready for this.

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I’ve been eating a lot of soup lately. It makes for a really fun fall lunch, and it makes sure that I consume more homemade bone broth. Some people can drink the stuff like water. I can’t. But in soup (or pot roast), flavorful stock is the secret to umami-filled meal.

The (other) secret to this soup is the presence of chestnuts. Chestnuts aren’t (quite) in season here yet. Plainview won’t see them until December, but my hometown of Fort Worth will probably have them by Thanksgiving. I just happened to stock up on some last Christmas, peel them, and freeze them for recipes this year. Today I decided to fish them out and use them is this delicious autumnal soup. You can use jarred chestnuts. I’ve seen those year-round in several higher-end grocery stores (Market Street, Sprouts, Central Market, etc.).

I also used acorn squash for this, but other winter squash varieties like pumpkin, butternut, or kabocha would work perfectly as well!

 

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Winter Squash & Chestnut Soup
Serves 2-4

1 tbsp butter or coconut oil
1 medium onion, diced
1-2 tsp salt (if using storebought broth, stick with one teaspoon and go up from there)
1 cup peeled chestnuts
3/4-1 lb winter squash flesh, cubed
3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced
2 cups homemade or low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 cup filtered water
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp coriander
1/4 tsp allspice
1 tsp fresh thyme
Yogurt, sour cream, or heavy cream for topping (optional)
Salted, toasted squash seeds for topping (optional)

Over medium-low heat, melt the butter in a medium saucepan. Once melted, add onion and salt and allow onion to soften, stirring occasionally.

Add chestnuts, winter squash, and garlic to the saucepan. Continue to cook over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add broth, water, black pepper, coriander, and allspice together in the pot. Stir and cover with a lid. Bring to boil and then reduce heat to maintain a simmer. Allow to simmer for 30 minutes.

Turn off heat and add in fresh thyme. Carefully transfer contents of the saucepan to a blender or food processor. On low-speed, blend until smooth, approximately 3 minutes.

Pour or ladle into bowls and serve as is or topped with yogurt/sour cream/heavy cream and squash seeds.

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Braised Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Hard Cider

 

Growing up, I didn’t eat a variety of vegetables. Most of my green vegetable consumption consisted of iceberg lettuce smothered in ranch dressing or green beans out of a can sprinkled with salt. Oh, and steamed broccoli was my side dish of choice going out. I just wasn’t exposed to much.

 

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But then I went away for college and all that changed. I ate asparagus, zucchini, artichokes, spinach. So many new foods and so many new preparations! I’m pretty sure I grew up thinking that I disliked vegetables, but now I firmly believe that one much taste a food in a variety of different preparations before concluding you actually dislike the food itself. One vegetable I think many dislike is the Brussels sprout. I don’t blame people for disliking it. It’s bitter and smells a little like gym sock, especially when steamed. But I don’t steam my Brussels sprouts. No, the tiny cabbage has become one of my favorite cruciferous vegetables (steamed broccoli with melted butter and salt still wins), but I either roast or braise mine! And when you pair Brussels sprouts with the salty savoriness of bacon and sweet tang of hard cider, you’ve got a great fall side dish! And just in time for the weather to turn cold. Smile

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Braised Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Hard Cider

Serves 2-4

1 lb Brussels sprouts
3 large shallots, sliced
3 large rashers of bacon, chopped
1/2 bottle of hard cider
salt & pepper to taste

Heat a pan on the stove over medium heat. Add the chopped bacon and sliced shallots and allow the bacon fat to render out and the shallots to become soft and fragrant.

In the meantime, using a knife or a slicing blade on a food processor, slice the Brussels sprouts into shreds.

When the shallots are soft and bacon fat fairly well rendered out, turn the heat up to medium-high and add the shredded sprouts. Saute for several minutes at this higher heat. When the sprouts are bright green (after about 3-5 minutes), pour in the hard cider, stir, and allow to cook down until there isn’t any cider pooling in the pan (a few more minutes). Salt and pepper to taste.

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Is there any food you disliked growing up but learned to love?

Fall Bucket List

Have you ever made a fall bucket list? I feel like I make one every year, whether I write it down or not. Fall is, of course, my favorite season. I am so obsessed with fall that I have an organized section on my video shelf that I understand to be “fall mood movies.” I eat pumpkin year-round, and I daydream about what to do the coming fall once January hits every year.

Last year, my bucket list consisted of things like, visit a corn maze (check), drink pumpkin ale (check—but still don’t like beer), and read The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and the Legend of Rip Van Winkle (started but didn’t finish. Is it just me or is Washington Irving painfully wordy?!). Some things, though, did not get finished and were moved to this year’s list. In this case, apple picking!

This past weekend, John and I visited our local apple orchard (Apple Country Orchards) for their annual Apple Butter Festival (sadly, Edgar had to work and could not join us). It was really just a small arts and crafts festival, but the real fun was walking through the orchards, bag or bucket in hand, picking your own apples (which can be done any day, really).

 

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The weather was perfect! We had a small cool front move through the panhandle that day, which provided a lovely, breezy snap in the air that truly invites feelings of early fall.

 

One of the things I learned on this trip was to not be so hard on myself that we have apple tree in our back yard, and even though many apples grew from them, bugs and/or birds got to them the MOMENT they were ripe, so a good percentage of them aren’t any good. Walking through the orchard made me realize that this is completely normal!

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We tried to make sure we got a good variety of apples. Apple Country Orchards raises a variety of trees so that at any given time of the year, SOMETHING is in season.

 

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In the end, we came home with ten pounds of apples between us, plus some raw apple cider (which I may or may not attempt to ferment into hard cider. It’s on my fall bucket list for this year!), and apple butter. Overwhelmed by the sheer number of apples we obtained, John and I spend yesterday evening baking up apple chips, baked stuffed apples, and Martha Stewart’s Apple-Butternut Squash soup.

This soup is pretty fantastic. It has a little spiciness that warms the back of your throat in the most comforting way possible. I won’t type out the recipe here since I followed the original pretty much to the letter, so I’ll just refer you to this link. I highly recommend you try it this fall.

 

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All these recipes and we still have 45 apples left! Do you have any suggestions for apple recipes? Also, what is on your fall bucket list?

Apple Inspirations

Do you ever feel too inspired?

For the past several weeks I’ve found myself exponentially more inspired every day. To read. To paint. To cook. To write. To dance. To decorate. To travel. To love… To sleep.

I find my synapses firing so rapidly that I can’t really sit and formulate any particular thought. My thoughts are a runaway stream of consciousness.

So forgive me if my writing seems disjointed or rudimentary.

But I do manage to find some success in the madness.

One of my inspirations has been this tart.

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It was meant to harken the images of New England in the fall. Apple, pecans, maple, and oats… Colonial style inns, headless horsemen, and ghost stories…

Perfect for October, right?

I also wanted something that I could eat for breakfast and feel good about. Nothing too sweet.  But perfectly satisfying. I want to wake up, eat a piece with a cup of tea and feel like it’s a special morning. Every day.

Or at least until the tart is gone.

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I first tried this recipe simply. Just the apples and brie with the sweetness and warmth from the maple syrup and spices. But I felt like it was missing another dimension.

So I tossed in some rosemary…

and it became perfect.

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Apple-Brie Tart with Oatmeal-Pecan Crust
Feeds 4-6

For the filling
2 medium-large apples
2 oz brie (I used goat brie)
2 tbsp real maple syrup (grade B if you can find it!)
1/8 tsp each ground clove and fresh grated nutmeg
2 tsp finely chopped rosemary

For the crust
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup butter, diced small, and chilled very cold
1/2 cup oat flour (I pre-measured a 1/2 cup of oats and ground them in my old coffee grinder)
1/4 cup pecans
1 tbsp sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a tart pan.

In a food processor, combine the oats, butter, oat flour, pecans, and sugar. Process until you have a fine meal that will hold together if you squeeze a bit in your hand.

Press the “dough” into the tart pan. Try to cover as much of the bottom and sides of the pan as possible.

Prick the dough with a fork and bake the crust for 12-15 minutes. This is called blind-baking, since there is no filling in it right now.

Meanwhile, slice the apples using a mandolin slicer, a food processor with a slicing blade, or fantastic hand-eye coordination with a knife. You want each piece as thin and evenly-cut as possible.

In a separate small bowl or saucer, combine maple syrup, clove, and nutmeg. Dip each apple slice into the syrup and drain off any excess. Place each apple slice in the crust in an even layer covering the bottom of the crust. Repeat with 1-2 more rows, or however many apple slices you have left.

Cut the brie into small chunks, preferably also evenly cut widths. Lay over top of the apple. Sprinkle with rosemary.

Bake until crust is golden, apples are crinkled, and cheese is melted.

Serve alongside coffee, raspberry tea, or apple cider. Winking smile

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What are your plans for this fall? Any fun recipes or activities?

On an unrelated note, who’s going to FoodBuzz?! I may or may not be. If I can figure out lodging arrangements, I have a pretty good chance of being there!

Homemade Breakfast Sausage

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Have you ever made your own sausage?

I consider sausage to be one of those real comfort foods—perfect for fall. But I also prefer to get my purchase my meat from quality sources (grass-fed, preferably local). This creates a problem in our area if we have a hankerin’ for some sausage, since once cannot and will not find pastured pork, turkey, chicken, or any other variety of sausage within a one-hour radius of my house. Sure, I could go to Sprouts in Lubbock and spend $8 on a package of six bison sausages, but why would I when I can make my own sausage in very little time at all, using quality ingredients of my own compilation and leaving out the stuff I just don’t need (nitrates/nitrites, excess salt, excess fat, etc.), and save so much money while I’m at it? Plus, when you have fresh flavors such as apple, sage, and fennel, who needs the store-bought stuff??

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Am I alone in that I tend to feel sick if I eat sausages in the morning? I used to love eating breakfast sausage until I realized that I felt sick every morning after I ate it. I realize now it was the excess grease. But since my pork was rather lean, I didn’t get that sickly feeling with this sausage! Another win!

 

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Apple-Sage Breakfast Sausage
Adapted from FineCooking.com

1 apple, diced finely (I used a jazz apple)
1/2 small onion (or one very tiny onion), diced fine
1 lb ground pork
1 small bunch (about 1/4 cup) fresh sage, minced fine
3/4 tsp fennel seeds, crushed (I used an old coffee grinder)
1/2 tsp whole allspice, crushed
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients together in a medium bowl until well distributed. Cover the bowl well with plastic wrap and park the bowl in the fridge for at least an hour, but preferably overnight.

In the morning (or afternoon or evening…), set a cast iron skillet to medium-high. Once heated, take about a 2-ounce portion of the pork mixture and form it into a patty. Cook on the cast iron skillet, flipping occasionally, so that the outside gets a slight crust and the inside is cooked thoroughly. No, you do not need to use additional oil. There is plenty of fat in the pork itself.

Serve with roasted sweet potatoes and poached eggs. Winking smile

 

 

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Mmmm. Tastes a little like Christmas.

My Favorite Season

 

It’s the very first day of fall! AHH! My favorite time of year!

The fall season brings back so many fond thoughts–

Pumpkins
Apples
Fireplaces
Cozy sweaters
Hay rides
Chili
“Haunted” houses
Ghost stories
Pecan pie
Pretty cool-weather clothes
Going outside and not sweating!!
(Okay, fine. It’s Texas, and there’s a good chance we’re still sweating up until Christmas, but still.)
Halloween + Thanksgiving
Crunchy leaves
Cheesy Halloween family movies
History class at school
(Uh. Okay, so I’m not in elementary school anymore, but I always learned the most in the first two months of the school year. Winking smile )
Lots of baking!
Pomegranates
Washington Irving
(The Legend of Sleepy Hollow + Rip Van Winkle)
Knitting

(half my kitchen, about this time last year. Complete with my original 2nd grade artwork!
I’ve since changed out all the old cabinet hardware!)

I’m SO excited for what this means for the blog, too. Smile I have SO many recipes to share with you all! In fact, next week I’ll be devoting the blog exclusively to apple recipes! You excited yet?! Smile Here’s a hint…

 

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What’s your favorite season?

What do you love about the fall season??

Weekend Addictions

 

Before I say anything I must interject just how gloriously happy I am that with the first of September brought a much-needed cool front to the area. It definitely feels like fall—chilly in the morning, cool in the shade, but the bright sun tickles warmly on the skin. I walked to work today wearing a new sweater with my goosebumped arms crossed tightly in front of my chest. I’m sipping my loose leaf chai and have my toenails painted “haute chocolate” (but I must say they’ve been painted that color for about a month now. My style knows no seasons). I dug out my fall décor and I’m bedazzling my house in shades of red and gold. One of my pumpkin plants produced its first pumpkin-ling this past weekend. And I have in mind to de-gluten-ify my pumpkin cookie recipe in the near future.

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This past weekend Edgar and I traveled to Fort Worth to visit my family and celebrate a ton of special occasions (mine, Edgar’s, my sister’s birthdays, plus my parents’ 25th anniversary). My mom secured us reservations at Brio’s Italian Restaurant in Southlake. My parents visited Italy this past summer and made a point of having an Italian “theme” to the evening, starting with dinner, followed by gelato, and ending with a photo slideshow of their trip. I was told to bring something nice to wear, which I sort of did, but also sort of failed in. Apparently my packing skills are going to pot. Two weekend trips in a row and I don’t really pack enough clothes. So I went shopping.

I love Plato’s Closet. I try to visit every time I’m in town. I’m officially a junkie. I also have a habit of buying clothes off the mannequins at that store.

Here’s what I ran away with!

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(like my “Haute Chocolate” toe nail polish? Heh heh)

2 Charlotte Russe tops (I’ve never shopped in that store, but I now have three of their tops. I must have a thing for ‘em)
1 Old Navy sweater
1 pair Gap 1969 jeans
. These really had to grow on me. I’m not really into the skinny jean trend (OR the cropped jean trend. I kinda like my long legs), and it typically doesn’t work well with my apple-shaped body type anyway. But I found these for $8 in my size, and they really didn’t look bad, so I walked around the store with them for two hours until I could put together the right top and shoes with them to make ‘em work. And now it totally works. I love these jeans!
1 pair of my favorite fitting Old Navy jeans ever. I’ve been in LOVE with the “Flirt” cut bootcuts since 2008 and I’ve yet to find a better fitting pair of jeans. I figured since I only had ONE pair of fitting jeans in my possession, I could use a spare in a different wash. And who can beat $10?!
1 pair Mossimo tweed-style grey stilettos. Hoo boy. As if I needed a reason to be 5’10”.
1 pair grey casual boots
1 awesome yellow bag

Total?? $61

omg.

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Here I am with my new outfit! And Edgar, who I am now taller than. Winking smile

Dinner at Brio’s was AMAZING. Unfortunately half my photos are on someone else’s memory card at the moment, but here are a few shots (taken with my point-and-shoot) from the evening!

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Sparkling water love.

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Yep. It’s a Sanders get-together alright. Cameras pointed EVERYWHERE.

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Amazing crack-ers and sourdough bread. Seriously, that’s rosemary-parmesan-flaxseed crackers and they were AWESOME.

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I made a point of ordering something nobody else was ordering. The problem is, all the things on the menu that looked the best to me were ordered by someone else! I went with the Citrus Chicken and Shrimp Scampi, which was good, but not as good as all the other dishes I was eyeing. Winking smile

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One of those dishes was Ed’s artichoke crusted beef tenderloin. WHAT.

It was probably the best dish on the table!

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Dessert was literally across the courtyard.

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Gelato, how I love thee.

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I picked a combo of Sea Salt with Caramel and Tiramisu (aka. BOOZY GELATO). Lovelovelovelovelove. The sea salt + caramel was probably the best, though. Winking smile

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The next day I also visited my next addiction—Central Market. I’ve visited quite a few foodie-type grocery stores in my day. Whole Foods, Trader Joes, Sprouts/Henry’s/Sun Harvest, Market Street, Sunflower Market, etc. Central Market is still, hands down, my absolute favorite. I was first intimidated by that store, but now I can’t stay away!

Check out my loot!

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Hatch chili tortilla chips (to be eaten with Jenna’s Creamy White Chicken Chili sometime next week)
4 different types of whole bean coffee! (Ed’s thing)
Sorghum flour (for GF baking)
Veggie broth
Grade B maple syrup
Beans (cannellini, black, and garbanzo)
San Marzano tomatoes
Italian tomato paste
Pomegranate (to, y’know, ring in the season. Winking smile )
Vanilla bean paste (so addicted.)
Almond meal
Kamut berries
Millet
Spelt berries
Arborio rice (I’ve got several risotto recipes up my sleeve soon!)
Walnuts
Black quinoa (for a friend!)
Fleur de sel
SO MANY LOOSE LEAF TEAS. Doc has me on 6 cups a day. I went all out!
Loose cardamom pods

 

Not pictured: lamb shoulder chops, fresh figs, and blue corn tortillas!

 

I tell you what, guys, I’m so excited for the fall season. I’ve got so many ideas for the blog, and I’ll be doing my best to blog more often and have even more recipes, so stay with me! Smile

 

How’s the weather in your parts?

What do you look forward to in the coming season?

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