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Hi, I'm Michelle! I'm a 25-year-old health-conscious foodie living in Southeast Virginia with my husband, Edgar, our baby boy, Isaac, and our chihuahua-mutt, Maggie! I'm just trying to live and eat as well as I can.

3 Phase Paleo by the Paleo Parents!

Winter Squash & Chestnut Soup

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Today, on the very first day of October, I turned off my air conditioner and opened my windows. There’s a slight chill in the air and I’m breathing it all in deep.

It’s really starting to feel like fall here. I spotted several yellow spots on varying trees. I can probably wear long sleeves without (too much) problem. At night, I wear sweatshirts when I go outside, and we even had a fire in our fireplace a few nights ago. My Netflix movie came in today. Sleepy Hollow.

I’m so ready for this.

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I’ve been eating a lot of soup lately. It makes for a really fun fall lunch, and it makes sure that I consume more homemade bone broth. Some people can drink the stuff like water. I can’t. But in soup (or pot roast), flavorful stock is the secret to umami-filled meal.

The (other) secret to this soup is the presence of chestnuts. Chestnuts aren’t (quite) in season here yet. Plainview won’t see them until December, but my hometown of Fort Worth will probably have them by Thanksgiving. I just happened to stock up on some last Christmas, peel them, and freeze them for recipes this year. Today I decided to fish them out and use them is this delicious autumnal soup. You can use jarred chestnuts. I’ve seen those year-round in several higher-end grocery stores (Market Street, Sprouts, Central Market, etc.).

I also used acorn squash for this, but other winter squash varieties like pumpkin, butternut, or kabocha would work perfectly as well!

 

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Winter Squash & Chestnut Soup
Serves 2-4

1 tbsp butter or coconut oil
1 medium onion, diced
1-2 tsp salt (if using storebought broth, stick with one teaspoon and go up from there)
1 cup peeled chestnuts
3/4-1 lb winter squash flesh, cubed
3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced
2 cups homemade or low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 cup filtered water
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp coriander
1/4 tsp allspice
1 tsp fresh thyme
Yogurt, sour cream, or heavy cream for topping (optional)
Salted, toasted squash seeds for topping (optional)

Over medium-low heat, melt the butter in a medium saucepan. Once melted, add onion and salt and allow onion to soften, stirring occasionally.

Add chestnuts, winter squash, and garlic to the saucepan. Continue to cook over medium-low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add broth, water, black pepper, coriander, and allspice together in the pot. Stir and cover with a lid. Bring to boil and then reduce heat to maintain a simmer. Allow to simmer for 30 minutes.

Turn off heat and add in fresh thyme. Carefully transfer contents of the saucepan to a blender or food processor. On low-speed, blend until smooth, approximately 3 minutes.

Pour or ladle into bowls and serve as is or topped with yogurt/sour cream/heavy cream and squash seeds.

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2 comments to Winter Squash & Chestnut Soup

  • Hey Michelle, I love your blog and recently started my own. Maybe you have a few tips for a newbie? :)

    • Thanks, Dominique! I hardly consider myself an expert. I still feel like a newbie after all these years! But I figure some good pointers would be,
      1) write what’s on your heart. Write for yourself and not anyone else.
      2) Get involved with the blogging community. Share in the conversation on other people’s blogs.
      3) Keep balanced. It’s easy to absorb so much from other people without putting your own stuff out there. That’s my problem!
      4) Find your inspiration and feed it. I write my better pieces when I blog earlier in the day, when my mind is more at rest.
      5) Keep a list of things you would like to blog about. If it aligns with your goals, make a schedule and plan ahead what you’re going to post within a week or month or whatever.

      There are other tips out there for those seeking to monetize their blogs in a more significant way. Problogger.net is a great resource for this. Every tip I’ve read there is great, but I’d say it’s a little ahead of where my efforts are right now. :)

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